Leer en español

2005/10/12 (EN)

FOTOCAT Status
Physically, FOTOCAT is an Excel file of UFO and IFO cases where an image has been obtained on photo, film or video. It contains various data columns to register the date, location and country, explanation (if one exists), photographer’s name, special photographic features, references, etc. When completed, the full catalog will be posted in internet, for free access from the worldwide UFO community.

- Case number: over the 6,000 mark!

The number of events cataloged at the time of writing is 6,005.
249 cases have been added since the last quarterly report. These were both current and old reports.

- Cut-off date

FOTOCAT emphasizes data collection for years past more than for the present; additionally, many of current entries come from the same, ad nauseam repetitive sources who take as UFO every single light they videotape in the sky or the effect of every bug or insect in front of their cameras. Also, many so-called anomalous images are due to lens flares and reflections. In sum, most of new cases are simply trash. However, processing and compiling and documenting new cases take a time we cannot allow the luxury to spend. In consequence, I have taken the decision to suspend the entry of new cases since December 31, 2005. FOTOCAT will then cover 1900 to 2005. This will allow me to concentrate on cases from older time frames.

- New Column: Time

FOTOCAT is an index of basic data to a major document archive. Its purpose is not to become a giant databank like Dave Saunders/Donald Johnson´s UFOCAT or Larry Hatch`s *U* Database, which manage a large volume of parameters. FOTOCAT has only 21 columns to collect what we feel is the minimum information needed to differentiate cases and to record the documentation conditions of our files. Although keeping it simple is fundamental to let it grow rapidly, we have just decided to add another column to retain the (local) Time when the event occurred. But it will be added inasmuch we compile regional catalogs in collaboration with local researchers. This is the case of Argentina. We are enjoying such a valuable help from national ufologists that we have been able to create a huge catalog for this Latin American country, one that reflects an exhaustive view of the history of UFO photography in a way never achieved before.

Also, time has been noted in the reports from Australia. In the future, the hour will be added to every entry in specific regional or national sub-catalogs. At the long run, the whole FOTOCAT will be thoroughly timed.

International Assistance
This section reports contributions received from new collaborators (or from regular ones which most recent contribution is considered outstanding). In addition to the new names cited here, many others are regularly contributing to the enlargement of FOTOCAT.

  • Catalonian UFO enthusiast and reporter Pedro Cantó has donated some 100 video tapes of TV programs to us. It represents a wide historical set of interviews, debates and presentations in Spain, including some interesting selection of UFO cases where images were recorded, of special value for the FOTOCAT archives.

  • Some 123 newspaper accounts of photographic events reported in Argentina in the sixties and seventies have been scanned and sent to us in CD by Roberto Enrique Banchs, long-time author and one of the most brilliant UFO researchers in Latin America. With the massive cooperation by Carlos Ferguson and others, we are reaching an unprecedented coverage for Argentina.

  • Patrick Gross, the French designer of ufologie.net. Ángel Rodriguez, Spanish Navy officer and president of GEIFO group.

  • The leadership of Anomaly Foundation, Matías Morey, José Ruesga and Julio Arcas, for their continuing support.


Catalog Tally
Some basic statistics derived from FOTOCAT.

UFOs Down Under

We are confident we have got already a sensible representation of UFO photographic cases reported in Australia. Not in vain, FOTOCAT includes the excellent catalogue prepared by veteran researcher Keith Basterfield. See it on line in this link: http://www.project1947.com/kbcat/kbphoto0405.htm

Therefore, we have compiled the Australian section of FOTOCAT and will display here the basic statistical information out of it. At the same time, this catalogue is being distributed to local ufologists from the Southern hemisphere for comments and additions.

FOTOCAT Australia as of September 2005 can be consulted by clicking on file (408 kb).

The current number of known reports is 225, or 3.8% of the overall number of cases on record in FOTOCAT. Phenomenology covers from 1935 to 2005.

- Distribution by Year
The cases are distributed by year as follows:

1935 1





1950 1 1960 0 1970 1 1980 3 1990 2 2000 5
1951 0 1961 5 1971 3 1981 2 1991 4 2001 9
1952 0 1962 0 1972 9 1982 0 1992 3 2002 9
1953 6 1963 1 1973 8 1983 0 1993 3 2003 4
1954 5 1964 1 1974 4 1984 1 1994 4 2004 16
1955 1 1965 4 1975 7 1985 2 1995 5 2005 7
1956 1 1966 4 1976 5 1986 0 1996 11
1957 0 1967 7 1977 4 1987 0 1997 9
1958 1 1968 9 1978 3 1988 2 1998 11
1959 1 1969 9 1979 3 1989 0 1999 9

Total 17
40
47
10
61
50


Waves are visibly clear in the middle of the fifties, late sixties and early seventies, followed by a surprisingly dull decade of the eighties. During the nineties the reports skyrocket and the high level persists –even it raises more- during the first years of the 21st century, probably accelerated by the information explosion of the internet.

This graph shows the annual report trend (or lack of, we should add):


- Time
A precise hour is known for 126 cases (56%). It is a too low figure, requiring improvement. An imprecise time (day, night, evening, noon) is known for 43 cases more (19%) and time of occurrence is definitely unknown for 56 cases (25%).

The distribution of reports by time is the following:

Time lapse All Unexplained Explained
0000-0001 1 1 0
0001-0002 2 2 0
0002-0003 1 1 0
0003-0004 2 2 0
0004-0005 5 4 1
0005-0006 5 2 3
0006-0007 4 2 2
0007-0008 3 2 1
0008-0009 1 0 1
0009-0010 2 1 1
0010-0011 3 2 1
0011-0012 4 3 1
0012-0013 3 2 1
0013-0014 3 3 0
0014-0015 5 2 3
0015-0016 3 2 1
0016-0017 9 5 4
0017-0018 11 6 5
0018-0019 7 4 3
0019-0020 12 9 3
0020-0021 15 13 2
0021-0022 9 8 1
0022-0023 9 6 3
0023-0024 7 3 4
Total 126 85 41


The single 60-minute period with a higher rate is from 20 to 21 hours, with 12% of the total; in fact, there is a broad increase in evening and night-time events, from 16 to 24 hours (amounting to 63% of all cases). Also, a second peak appears from 4 to 8 hours (14%).

But if cases are sorted between explained and unexplained, the resulting picture is not identical each other. In this sample, the unexplained events are markedly nightly, with 43 (or 50%) placed in the 18-23 hour interval, while the explained events are less night-time biased, with 16 (or 39%) cases placed in the same time period.

The following statistical graph shows this discrepancy well.


The small size of the sample precludes making serious conclusions about this UFO versus IFO effect.

- Nature of Phenomena

For 167 cases (74%) there is no explanation proposed by the sources, while the remaining 58 cases (26%) have been solved. If enough investigation would have been carried out on the reported phenomena, probably the actual UFO/IFO percentages would reverse, as the experience elsewhere dictates. In order to improve the quality of the data, we are facilitating this version of the catalogue to a number of Australian organizations and researchers. I hope their input will refine the sample.

Regarding the classes of solutions invoked to solve the photographic reports, this is the familiar array of explanations found:

Fake (a quite expected finding):
12
Astronomical (stars and planets):
10
Balloons and kites:
8
Aircraft (including contrails):
7
Birds and insects:
6
Lens flare:
5
Camera, film or development flaw:
3
Clouds:
3
Other (miscellaneous):
4


- Geography

Australia is divided in 8 political regions. The 225 cases in the catalogue are geographically distributed as follows:

ACT (Australia Capital Territory):
2
NSW (New South Wales):
65
NT (Northern Territory):
10
Q (Queensland):
37
SA (South Australia):
31
T (Tasmania):
15
VIC (Victoria):
34
WA (Western Australia):
25


Additionally we have 1 case for Papua New Guinea (in the fifties this territory was administered by Australia) as well as 5 more cases where the location is not known.

- Format

Photograph: 158 (70%) (during all period)
Film: 17 (08%) (up to 1977)
Video: 50 (22%) (since 1990)


- Special Photo Features

In 27 cases (12%) the alleged UFO image was found in the picture without anything strange had been observed by the photographer or cameraperson when the film was taken. For 10 of those pictures there is not a solution advance, in spite of the high probability to be spurious images.
In 11 cases (5%) the film was allegedly confiscated by authorities, lost, blank, burned or simply missing . Too much evidence spoiled.
In 3 cases, special sensitivity film or night vision camera were used to record the images.

- Cameraperson

The name of the photographer is identified (at least in the information source I have collected) in 107 cases (48%) and the cameraperson is unknown to us in another 118 reports (52%). I guess it is an artefact due to poor summarizing in the published information or an over zeal to protect witness identity.

Two individuals have reported having taken a photo, film or video recording of a UFO in more than one occasion, something which may be a doubtful pattern: a Chris Beacham, who took photos in 1963, 1964 and 1965) and a Barry Taylor (UFO researcher) who claims to have obtained UFO images in the last 30 years. This version of the Australian catalogue only gathers 7 of his photograph and footage cases, but he reports to have taken numerous more! A lucky guy indeed.

Invited Article
Where regularly we will include any published literary piece on curious phenomenology.

Juan Carlos Victorio Uranga, a notable Spanish analys of UFO observations, has written specially for our blog an essay devoted to the examination of one of the most classic UFO photos in the phenomenology paranorama in Spain: the Malaga case of March 27, 1974, an event that made headlines and was in the covers of several local and national newspapers at the epoch.

The following pair of takes, published here thanks to the courtesy of the SUR newspaper, represents the kind of enigma under study by Mr Victorio Uranga.


His work, entitled “What was seen in Málaga on the night of 27 March 1974?”, can be read complete in its original Spanish version by clicking on article (492 kb).

UFOworld News
This is a brief item report for the serious and critical-minded UFO researcher. Some selected information sources which I judge of interest for gaining knowledge from a scientifically-oriented perspective.

- Missile UFOs
In the seventies, a number of visually and camera-recorded UFO sightings were produced in the Portuguese and Spanish territories in the Atlantic Ocean. Some of the dates where photographs were achieved were November 22, 1974 (Madeira islands) and June 22, 1976 and March 5, 1979 (11 different series of pictures) in the Canary islands. A paper by Vicente-Juan Ballester Olmos and Ricardo Campo Pérez covering this subject has been published in the latest issue of the International UFO Reporter (J. Allen Hynek Center for UFO Studies). Entitled “Navy Missile Tests and the Canary Islands UFOs”, it can be found in IUR, Vol 29, No 4, cover and pages 3 to 9 and 26 (CUFOS, 2457 West Peterson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60659, USA).

A French version of this paper (“Les Essais de Missiles de la Marine U.S. et les Observations d’OVNI aux Isles Canaries”), can be read in La Gazette Fortéenne, Vol. I, August 2002, pp. 229-246.

Assistance Call

Your volunteer collaboration to the FOTOCAT Project is kindly requested. Please write to: fotocat@anomalia.org.

We will supply you with state, regional, provincial or national catalogs for you to check and enlarge.

If you are willing to donate photographic materials, files or literature to be preserved, feel free to use the following postal address:

Vicente-Juan Ballester Olmos
Apartado de Correos 12140
46080 Valencia
Spain

2005/10/12 (ES)

FOTOCAT Status
Físicamente, FOTOCAT es un archivo de Excel de casos OVNI y OVI en que se ha obtenido una imagen en fotografía, película o vídeo. Contiene diversas columnas de datos para registrar la fecha, lugar y país, explicación (si existe), nombre del fotógrafo, características fotográficas especiales, referencias, etc. Cuando se haya completado, el catálogo completo se hará accesible desde Internet para la libre consulta de toda la comunidad ufológica mundial.

- Número de casos: ¡superamos la cifra de 6.000!

A fecha de hoy, el número de informes censados por FOTOCAT asciende a 6.005, lo que supone un incremento de 249 casos desde el pasado informe trimestral. Son casos tanto actuales como antiguos.

- Fecha de corte

FOTOCAT pone énfasis en la adquisición de casos históricos, más que corrientes; además, muchos de los nuevos registros proceden ad nauseam de las mismas fuentes repetitivas que toman como ovni cualquier luz que graban en el cielo, o el efecto de cualquier insecto o pájaro que se cruza delante de sus videocámaras. Sin olvidar tantos reflejos producidos en las lentes. En suma, la mayoría de los nuevos casos son simplemente basura. Sin embargo, recopilar, archivar y procesar esa información consume un tiempo que no podemos permitirnos el lujo de perder. En consecuencia, he tomado la decisión de suspender la entrada de casos nuevos desde el 31 de diciembre de 2005. FOTOCAT cubrirá el periodo 1900 a 2005. Esto me permitirá concentrarme en ingresar informes de años pasados.

- Nueva columna. Hora

FOTOCAT es un índice de datos elementales de un importante archivo de documentación. Su propósito no es convertirse en una base de datos como el UFOCAT de Dave Saunders /Donald Johnson ni como la base de datos OVNI *U* de Larry Hatch, que gestionan un enorme número de parámetros. FOTOCAT tiene sólo 21 columnas para registrar la información mínima precisa para diferenciar los casos y para anotar las condiciones de la documentación de nuestros archivos. Aunque mantenerlo simple es fundamental para su rápido crecimiento, hemos decidido añadir una columna más para retener el dato de la hora local del suceso. Pero se añadirá en tanto en cuanto halla compilado catálogos regionales en colaboración con investigadores locales. Este es el caso de Argentina. Estamos disfrutando de tan valiosa ayuda de estudiosos nacionales que hemos logrado crear un inmenso catálogo para este país hermano, que refleja exhaustivamente la historia del fenómeno ovni en su vertiente fotográfica como jamás antes se ha conseguido.

También hemos añadido el dato horario para los casos de Australia. En el proceso final de definir el catálogo argentino se establecerá la hora de cada avistamiento. Esto lo haremos también para cada futuro catálogo regional o nacional. Y a la larga, todo el FOTOCAT estará debidamente datado.

Colaboración Internacional
Esta sección recoge las contribuciones recibidas de nuevos colaboradores (o de otros ya habituales cuyas recientes aportaciones sean relevantes). Además de los que aquí se citan, muchos otros investigadores siguen contribuyendo regularmente al crecimiento de FOTOCAT.

  • El periodista ufológico catalán Pedro Cantó nos ha donado unas 100 cintas de video de programas de televisión. Representa una amplia visión histórica de entrevistas, debates y presentaciones en España, incluyendo una interesante selección de casos ovni en los que se grabaron imágenes, de especial valor para los archivos FOTOCAT.

  • Nada menos que 123 recortes de prensa sobre casos ovni fotográficos en Argentina en las décadas de los sesenta y setenta nos han sido copiados en un CD y remitidos por Roberto Enrique Banchs, destacado autor y uno de los más brillantes investigadores de Latinoamérica. Con la masiva ayuda de Carlos Ferguson, entre otros, estamos alcanzando una cobertura sin precedetes para Argentina.

  • Patrick Gross, diseñador francés de la web ufologie.net. Ángel Rodriguez, suboficial de la Marina y presidente del grupo GEIFO.

  • El liderazgo de la Fundación Anomalía, Matías Morey, José Ruesga y Julio Arcas, por su continuado apoyo.


Recuento del Catálogo
Algunas estadísticas básicas extraídas del FOTOCAT.

OVNIs en las antípodas

A estas alturas tenemos la confianza de que tenemos ya una sensible representación de los casos ovni fotográficos ocurridos en Australia. No en vano FOTOCAT incluye el excelente catálogo preparado por el veterano estudioso Keith Basterfield. Está on line y puede leerse en el siguiente enlace: http://www.project1947.com/kbcat/kbphoto0405.htm

Por consiguiente, hemos decidido aislar la sección Australia de FOTOCAT y vamos a desplegar su información estadística básica. Al mismo tiempo, estamos enviando este catálogo a diversos ufólogos y organizaciones del país para sus comentarios y adiciones.

El número actual de casos conocidos es de 225, lo que representa el 3.8% del total de casos anotados en FOTOCAT. La fenomenología cubre desde 1935 a 2005.

FOTOCAT Australia, a fecha de Septiembre de 2005, puede consultarse descargando este archivo: fcaustralia.xls (408 kb)

- Distribución por año

Esta es la distribución anual de casos:

1935 1





1950 1 1960 0 1970 1 1980 3 1990 2 2000 5
1951 0 1961 5 1971 3 1981 2 1991 4 2001 9
1952 0 1962 0 1972 9 1982 0 1992 3 2002 9
1953 6 1963 1 1973 8 1983 0 1993 3 2003 4
1954 5 1964 1 1974 4 1984 1 1994 4 2004 16
1955 1 1965 4 1975 7 1985 2 1995 5 2005 7
1956 1 1966 4 1976 5 1986 0 1996 11
1957 0 1967 7 1977 4 1987 0 1997 9
1958 1 1968 9 1978 3 1988 2 1998 11
1959 1 1969 9 1979 3 1989 0 1999 9

Total 17
40
47
10
61
50


Hay “oleadas” claramente visibles a mitad de los cincuenta, a final de los sesenta y al principio de los setenta, seguidos por una década de los ochenta sorprendentemente vacía. Durante los noventa, el número de informes se dispara y el alto nivel persiste –incluso crece más- durante los primeros años del siglo 21, probablemente acelerado por la explosión de información de Internet.

Este gráfico muestra la distribución anual de los informes:


- Hora

Se conoce la hora exacta en 126 casos (56%). Nos resulta una cifra muy baja y esperamos una mejora de ese nivel de datos. Una hora imprecisa (día, noche, tarde, mediodía) la conocemos en otros 43 casos (19%) y la hora del suceso se desconoce completamente en 56 casos (25%).

Esta es la distribución horaria de los informes australianos:

Hora Total Inexplicados Explicados
0000-0001 1 1 0
0001-0002 2 2 0
0002-0003 1 1 0
0003-0004 2 2 0
0004-0005 5 4 1
0005-0006 5 2 3
0006-0007 4 2 2
0007-0008 3 2 1
0008-0009 1 0 1
0009-0010 2 1 1
0010-0011 3 2 1
0011-0012 4 3 1
0012-0013 3 2 1
0013-0014 3 3 0
0014-0015 5 2 3
0015-0016 3 2 1
0016-0017 9 5 4
0017-0018 11 6 5
0018-0019 7 4 3
0019-0020 12 9 3
0020-0021 15 13 2
0021-0022 9 8 1
0022-0023 9 6 3
0023-0024 7 3 4
Total 126 85 41


El periodo de 60 minutos con mayor número de casos es el que va de las 20 a las 21 horas, con un 12% del total. De hecho, hay un amplio incremento de la frecuencia de casos en la tarde y noche, de las 16 a las 24 horas, que supone el 63% de la totalidad. Asimismo se observa una cresta secundaria de las 4 a las 8 de la mañana (14%).

Pero cuando los casos se separan entre inexplicados y explicados, lo que resulta no es tan idéntico entre sí. En esta muestra, los sucesos inexplicados son marcadamente nocturnos, con 43 (o 50%) situados en el intervalo 18 a 23 horas, mientras que los casos explicados tienen una menor orientación nocturna, con 16 (o 39%) casos situados en ese mismo intervalo.

El siguiente gráfico estadístico muestra bien esta discrepancia:


El pequeño tamaño del muestreo evita establecer conclusiones serias sobre este efecto OVNI versus OVI.

- Naturaleza de los fenómenos

Para 167 casos (74%) no hay ninguna solución propuesta en las fuentes consultadas, mientras que 58 casos (26%) se han resuelto. Si se hubiera llevado a cabo una investigación de campo suficiente, probablemente esos porcentajes se revertirían, de acuerdo con lo que dicta la experiencia de análisis universal. Con la finalidad de mejorar la calidad de los datos, estamos facilitando copias del catálogo Australia a varios investigadores y organizaciones australianas. Espero que su respuesta ayude a refinar la muestra..

Con respecto a los tipos de soluciones invocadas para aclarar los informes fotográficos, este es el conjunto familiar de explicaciones:

Fraude (hallazgo esperable):
12
Astronómico (estrellas y planetas):
10
Globos y cometas:
8
Aviones (y trazas de condensación):
7
Pájaros e insectos:
6
Reflejos en la lente:
5
Fallos de película o de revelado:
3
Nubes:
3
Otros (miscelánea):
4


- Geografía

Australia está dividia en 8 regiones políticas. Los 225 casos del catálogo se distribuyen geográficamente como sigue:

ACT (Australia Capital Territory):
2
NSW (New South Wales):
65
NT (Northern Territory):
10
Q (Queensland):
37
SA (South Australia):
31
T (Tasmania):
15
VIC (Victoria):
34
WA (Western Australia):
25


Adicionalmente tenemos 1 caso de Papúa Nueva Guinea (territorio administrado por Australia en los cincuenta) y otros 5 casos más sin que se conozca la localización exacta.

- Formato

Fotografía: 158 (70%) (durante todo el período)
Película: 17 (08%) (hasta 1977)
Vídeo: 50 (22%) (desde 1990)


- Características fotográficas especiales

En 27 casos (12%) la supuesta imagen ovni se halló en la fotografía sin mediar observación visual de fenómeno extraño ninguno. Para 10 de esas fotos no se postula ninguna explicación, a pesar de que exista una alta probabilidad de que se trate solamente de imágenes espurias.
En 11 casos (5%) la película fue supuestamente confiscada por las autoridades, se perdió, salió en blanco o se quemó. Demasiada evidencia echada a perder.
En 3 casos, se usó película de especial sensibilidad o cámara de visión nocturna para registrar las imágenes.

- Fotógrafos

El nombre del fotógrafo está identificado (al menos en la fuente de información que poseo) en 107 casos (48%), mientras que el testigo que sacó las imágenes resulta desconocido en otros 118 informes (52%). Espero que se trate de un artificio debido a que los resúmenes de casos publicados no hayan sido lo completos que debieran o bien se deba a un exceso de celo para proteger la identidad de los testigos.

Dos personas aparecen como responsables de la toma de fotos ovni en más de una ocasión, lo que nos resulta un patrón sospechoso. Chris Beacham, que hizo fotos en 1963, 1964 y 1965, y el ufólogo Barry Taylor, que afirma haber obtenido imágenes ovni en numerosas oportunidades en los últimos 30 años. Nuestra versión del catálogo de Australia sólo recoge, sin embargo, 7 de sus casos. ¡Un tipo con suerte!

Artículo invitado
Regularmente incluiremos algún trabajo relativo a fenomenología fotográfica anómala que juzgamos de interés divulgar.

Juan Carlos Victorio Uranga, reconocido analista vasco de observaciones ovni, ha escrito especialmente para nuestro blog un ensayo dedicado al examen de una de las fotografías más del clásicas de la casuística ovni en España: el caso del 27/3/74 en Málaga, que fue acogido en portada tanto en diarios locales como nacionales.

El siguiente par de tomas, publicadas aquí gracias a la cortesía del diario SUR, representan el enigma que ha sido estudiado por Victorio Uranga.


Su trabajo, titulado “¿Qué se vio en Málaga la noche del 27 de marzo de 1974?”, puede leerse completo pinchando sobre artículo (492 kb)

Noticias del Mundo OVNI
Un breve informe para el investigador serio y crítico. Fuentes de información seleccionada que juzgo de interés para adquirir conocimientos desde una perspectiva con orientación científica.

- OVNIs y misiles
En los años setenta, varias observaciones ovni, tanto oculares como fotográficas, se produjeron en los territorios atlánticos de España y Portugal. Algunas de las fechas en que se consiguieron fotos fueron el 22 de noviembre de 1974 en las islas Madeira y 22 de junio de 1976 y 5 de marzo de 1979 (11 series de fotografías conocidas) en las islas Canarias. Un ensayo firmado por Vicente-Juan Ballester Olmos y Ricardo Campo Pérez dedicado a estos avistamientos se ha publicado en el último número del International UFO Reporter (J.Allen Hynek Center for UFO Studies). Titulado “Navy Missile Tests and the Canary Islands UFOs”, puede leerse en inglés en IUR, Volumen 29, Número 4, portada y páginas de la 3 a la 9 y 26 (CUFOS, 2457 West Peterson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60659, USA).

Una traducción en francés de este artículo (“Les Essais de Missiles de la Marine U.S. et les Observations d’OVNI aux Isles Canaries”), se publicó en La Gazette Fortéenne, Vol. I, agosto de 2002, páginas 229-246.

Llamada a su colaboración

Solicitamos su colaboración altruista con el Proyecto FOTOCAT. Por favor escríbanos a: fotocat@anomalia.org

Facilitaremos listados de casos regionales, provinciales o nacionales para su revisión, corrección y ampliación.

Si desea donar material fotográfico, archivos o bibliografía que quiera ver preservados, le rogamos use la siguiente dirección postal:

Vicente-Juan Ballester Olmos
Apartado de Correos 12140
46080 Valencia
España